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Ear Infections

One common home health problem that frequently arises is that of middle ear infections, also known by their Latin name, otitis media. Most children experience a few episodes of otitis media, usually association with a cold or upper respiratory infection.

Here are some of the common, and truly indispensible, remedies to consider for children (or adults) with ear infections.

Chamomilla: You can hear the child who needs Chamomilla down the hall and through a closed door. They are uncomfortable and irritable, and they want you to know it. There is something in their cry that puts you on edge; it’s the kind of cry that causes adults to think things like, “Would someone please shut that kid up!?” The child demands to be carried and screams when put down. They demand this or that, but throw the object of their desire away when they finally get it. Another peculiar symptom that may occur is that one cheek may be glowing red, while the other is pale.

Pulsatilla: A child needing Pulsatilla is also tearful, but quite different from the Chamomilla patient. Here the cry is usually wimpier, creating a reaction in the surrounding adults of, ‘Oh, the poor thing!’ The child clearly wants sympathy and nurturing. Discharges (such as a runny nose) are usually yellow or green, thick, and bland – not irritating. They typically have little thirst or appetite and they generally feel better in fresh, open air.

Belladonna: Belladonna is appropriate for ear infections with sudden, violent onsets. The child is typically hot, red, and dry. The pupils are often dilated and the eyes seem very bring. Curiously, the head is often hot but the limbs are cold. The nervous system is affected in such a way that the child often experiences twitching or jerking – perhaps in their sleep- and is sensititve to light and jarring. They are often excited and restless.

Ferrum phosphoricum: The child needing Ferrum phosphoricum may first be mistaken for one needing Belladonna. The symptoms are similar, but less intense. The child is often excited, sensitive to light and jarring, but not to the extent of the child needing Belladonna. They are often red, but not as intensely red; hot, but not as burning; eyes red, but not so bright.

Hepar sulphuris: Think of Hepar sulphuris when the child is chilly, sweats easily, and often has an accompanying hoarse, barking cough. Discharges are typically thick and yellow, and pains are often sticking (like splinters).

Learn how much to take and how often to take a remedy.