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Pets

In general, the remedy you would give to a human for a particular medical issue is the same remedy you would give to a pet for a similar medical issue. You must simply observe your pet to determine the correct remedy to give. For example, you might notice that your sick dog, who usually prefers to sleep on the couch cushion, is lying on the cold tile floor in front of the door which is leaking a winter draft. You could conclude that the dog feels better from the moving air and might consider Pulsatilla. Or you might consider Acconite after noticing that your pet is coughing and sneezing in the evening after a long run outside in especially cold, windy weather.

Below is an abbreviated list of some of common pet medical concerns and remedies you might consider when treating them:

  • Aconite: scratched eye, especially from fights; beginning colds/coughs/fight after labor and delivery.
  • Arnica: injury; after labor and delivery; exhaustion during prolonged labor.
  • Arsenicum: vomiting/diarrhea/stomach upset; “cat flu”; a gastroenteritis.
  • Calcium phosphorica: epileptic seizures; fall on side, clamp jaws, foam at mouth.
  • Calendula: external treatment for wounds.
  • Ferrum phosphorica: bleeding wounds, after phosphorus.
  • Hepar sulphur: inflamed, infected wounds; ear canker, abscess in middle ear.
  • Ignatia: grief after owner’s death or absence; homesickness being left at kennel.
  • Phosphorus: bad chest cold; hoarse sore throat; fear of thunderstorms; cheerful temperament; bleeding wounds; any profuse bleeding.
  • Pulsatilla: after birthing to help empty uterus.
  • Ruta: joint stiffness.
  • Silica: infected wounds if Hepar sulphur has not helped; slow wound healing.
  • Veratrum album: stomach upset if Arsenicum has not helped.

Learn how much to take and how often to take a remedy.